FAQ’s

Some great advice and questions to consider when choosing a private health fund Please see the link from the Australian Dental Association www.ada.org.au

For most people, about every 6 months is the correct interval. This is usually based on the amount of scale build up that forms on your teeth and therefore some people, we may extend as far as 12 months and in the other extreme, some people may need to see their dentist every 3 to 4 months. Other factors such as caries rate,various general medical conditions, and the wearing of appliances such as orthodontic braces will also influence the desired period between intervals.

If you see blood on your toothbrush or in the sink after you spit out after brushing your teeth, this is a sign of a low grade (or worse) infection in your gums. This may be due to inadequate home care strategies (are you using floss/interproximal brushes on a regular basis?), but is often a sign that the hardened build-up, called calculus (scale/tartar) is starting to return and it may be time for your oral health care provider to remove these deposits.

Amalgam is one of the most used and studied materials used in the human body. No peer reviewed studies have every demonstrated any adverse health outcomes. However, no filling material is ideal in satisfying every desired property for a tooth filling material. That is why your dentist will discuss with you the pros and cons of metal versus resin versus porcelain filling materials. For more information, see the following fact sheet produced by the Australian Dental Association: factsheet.pdf

The old proverb ‘a stitch in time saves nine’ is never more true than with dental care. Preventive care is not only cheaper, but much simpler and can even be pleasant. So, delaying your visit to the dentist will more than likely make your dental bills worse, not better. Part of good preventive care has to be appropriate home care strategies and your dentist will happily advise you on how to best achieve these.

Yes! Almost certainly if it is done in a controlled manner with monitoring. Studies have shown questionable changes to tissues in rats when subject to high concentrations of bleach but for obvious reasons, these studies have not been done in humans. It is for this reason that when whitening your teeth it should always be well monitored.

Clinic Hours

Monday – Thursday 8:30 – 5:00
Friday 8:30 – 4:00
Saturday (By Appointment) 9:00 – Midday

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